The Benefits of Loyalty

Slowly but surely, my boxing skills start to improve.

And last weekend, I didn’t realize how sore my last training session had made my inner thighs until my massage therapist got started.

And that’s the crux:

If I had a new trainer each session, I wouldn’t advance. If I had a new massage therapist every visit, she wouldn’t know what to work or what areas of my body she had permission to touch.

Loyalty has benefits.

Sticking with one person or company will get you

  • better results,
  • extra consideration for needs and modifications and specializations,
  • perks and freebies, and
  • top-notch customer service.

Why? The person or people you work with know you, understand you, and want to keep you coming back.

Every time you switch providers, you must completely reeducate.

Consistency and loyalty have benefit for personal relationships as well—both friendships and romances. When I moved cities every three years for a while, I enjoyed meeting new people with a completely fresh slate each time. Yet now that I’ve lived in one place long enough, my friendships have strengthened, deepened, expanded, grown.

Of course, the person to whom and company to which you’re loyal can’t get so comfortable that laxity sets in. For loyalty to work in your favor, they must proactively observe how you’ve changed over time and adapt. If they don’t—or if they grow diametrically—you will need to end the relationship or pull back significantly.

I’d hope, with open communication, to prevent a switch.

Where have you devoted loyalty for years? What benefits have you seen in return?